Alec Baldwin Shooting

Led Zeppelin

Active Member

We are Borg

Administrator
Staff member

I thought the first rule about gun safety was to never even point a gun at anyone, no matter if you think it's loaded or not.
Yes its the most common rule but when shooting a serie or movie it needs to be realistic so you point and shoot. What is weird is that real bullets where on set that is inexcusable to do.
 

Akamia

Member
What I’d like to know is how anyone was able to miss that real bullets were on set and didn’t remove them.
 

ldmitruk

Active Member
Yes its the most common rule but when shooting a serie or movie it needs to be realistic so you point and shoot. What is weird is that real bullets where on set that is inexcusable to do.
Agreed. Apparently some of the crew would use the prop guns for plinking. If you ask me, after a scene is shot or filming is complete for the day the guns should be locked up with trigger locks in a gun safe. Also no live ammo,other than blanks should be allowed on set. This entire tragedy is complete failure of safety within the industry.
 

*SD*

Administrator
Staff member
It is very strange that live rounds somehow got 'mixed up' with blanks. I haven't looked into the tragedy too much but something does seem a bit off about it.
 

Led Zeppelin

Active Member
I actually would fine with not having real guns used at all in movies. It's just not worth the risk. Especially not for any shitty film Alec Baldwin would make.

Im surprised they even still use real guns, considering the technology we have today.
 

BoganUSAFFLClerk

Active Member

I thought the first rule about gun safety was to never even point a gun at anyone, no matter if you think it's loaded or not.
You literally cannot follow gun safety rules 100% of the time in every situation prop gun or not. That is an impossibility. At some point in some circumstances you will have to.
 

BoganUSAFFLClerk

Active Member
Yes its the most common rule but when shooting a serie or movie it needs to be realistic so you point and shoot. What is weird is that real bullets where on set that is inexcusable to do.
According to one source I have read the police found 500 rounds of FMJs (range/training ammo) on set. FMJs and blanks loaded in the same box. There is a reason MTM makes varying boxes to reload ammunition with. Too bad the person in question was too stupid to follow common sense or best practices when it comes to firearms or ammunition more to the point.
 

BoganUSAFFLClerk

Active Member
What I’d like to know is how anyone was able to miss that real bullets were on set and didn’t remove them.
That set supposedly had multiple problems with being cheap. One such problem was the production staff getting hotels and motels out of state where the production was happening in order to save money.

They didn't have a firearms wrangler/armorer or firearms expert on staff due to the budget. So the assistant director I believe was a stand in for one.
 

BoganUSAFFLClerk

Active Member
Agreed. Apparently some of the crew would use the prop guns for plinking. If you ask me, after a scene is shot or filming is complete for the day the guns should be locked up with trigger locks in a gun safe. Also no live ammo,other than blanks should be allowed on set. This entire tragedy is complete failure of safety within the industry.
I'm fine with going target shooting with actual firearms. The problem comes when you don't procedure and back and clean firearms. Some require that you pull the trigger in order to disassemble them. Every firearm is loaded until proven otherwise. Check chamber and clear. Apparently someone got very lazy.
 

BoganUSAFFLClerk

Active Member
It is very strange that live rounds somehow got 'mixed up' with blanks. I haven't looked into the tragedy too much but something does seem a bit off about it.
One source claims that Police found 500 FMJs on set. They were mixed in with the same set of reloading MTM cans as blanks. Someone got lazy.
 

We are Borg

Administrator
Staff member
Too bad the person in question was too stupid to follow common sense or best practices when it comes to firearms or ammunition more to the point.
Common sense was by not allowing real bullets on set. Do not know what procedures they followed but at least 3 safety checks should have been done the first when getting the bullets, second while loading and third when giving to the cast. Best would be if cast knew what to look for.
 

Led Zeppelin

Active Member
You literally cannot follow gun safety rules 100% of the time in every situation prop gun or not. That is an impossibility. At some point in some circumstances you will have to.
I still don't see why you would need to point a real gun at another person in order to make a movie.
 
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